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Online Share Trading

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Annual Performance

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Super Contributor
You a fantastic holiday as well!
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Super Contributor
you must have... should have come out, sorry for the typo.
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Super Contributor
my positions are reviewed annually to see if they're still conforming to the original acquisition logic, if not i will consider selling to realign the portfolio to better more attractive investments. I see it that if i allocate R100k to a R1m portfolio it makes the value up to R1.1m and i have 10% to allocate to discounted acquisitions that offer value (this increases my value/margin of safety on my whole portfolio slightly) and then together with the existing positions which will all have above average long term growth (otherwise it would be considered for a sale) i can achieve my goals. If there is a position thats highly over priced and doesn't have the future i look for its as good as gone in the portfolio. What i also do is accumulate cash when i cannot find decent bargains then when the corrections/crashes come put that funds (together with possible realignments) to use, so i can then get a better growth rate. This has worked well for me over the past years and i will stick to this system. Its very important to try to get an educated guess on where the industries, markets and individual companies are going though because this helps you find the trends and where the profits will come from. I like Grindrod (it will pick up when the shipping and economies pick up again, got some very cheap shares over the years) and banks will make money again when times change, getting very cheap shares in some of them will only be useful as times change - another thing is patience - its very important!
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Contributor
In my A account I achieved 23.17% growth(inclusive of costs and dividends reinvested). My B acount achieved 21.14% as above with costs and divies. Both porfolio's are long term, however we range trade 10% of the A portfolio.
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Super Contributor
I work with the financial year and not calender, generally under performed the market and was to be expected after outperforming the market last financial year.I also only buy and have not sold for years, however will review all portfolios in march 2011, as some of mine and ex's require good dividend flow, although not needed yet,but will in 2 to 3 years time when I decide to call it a day.Besides my portfolio's, look after kid's grandkid's and ex's portfolio (9 in total), with worst 8.4% and best 20.1%, My CFD 26.7% and SSF 34.1%, from 1st Mar to 30 Nov. Generally quite happy (as even the worst which has quite high exposure to finacials),the final result is better than cash in the bank
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Super Contributor
33% (at one stage 60% but lost quite a bit over last 2 months) purely trading ssf converted to cfd's now due to ssf changes.
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Regular Contributor
a measly 6% Had some losses from the previous year that i dumped and then also got caught with IMPSTD badly.NNot making any excuses all my dumb emotional calls got me down
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Contributor
22%, purely long approach, big contributors SHP and CFR, also DDT before I sold those for roughly 40% return when the BO was announced. This is the second portfolio I've created. The first one I setup in 2008, which was not in hindsight a good time to be `learning' about investing in stocks. Still down on that one and no longer touching it. Interestingly, there are still a lot of fundamentals that I don't entirely understand but am trying to learn. In making my decisions I have invested in companies mainly where there are consistent gains i.e. I tend to only really buy `winners'. Bought Famous Brands when it was 35% up in my watchlist.and I myself have made a further 25% on that since. I also base decisions on positive financial results, research reports, actual plans for growth and the track record of the board. That's really it. Other considerations are the dividend %, and a small amount of intuition. Have not had a single loss this year (i.e. currently minimum gain is 5%), but that could change I suppose and wasn't always the case during the year (same share was down over 11% at one point). Very happy with this years performance though and getting ready for next year. Want to add some Grindrod to my collection next.
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Super Contributor
I like your comments, it makes sense and don't try to use every single indicator or fundamental value, keep it simple and as long as you understand your strategy thats all that really counts, Buffett also keeps his strategy simple! GND is excellent, i have been holding and acquiring for 6+ years now.
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Super Contributor
Would be interesting to know on average how many shares are held in long term portfolios. Less than 10? or 15? or more. Would like to hear from you guys please.
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Contributor
Bearing in mind that my portfolio is only about 18 months old, at the moment 9 different companies, but my watchlist has around double that amount on it, and there are at least 3 more that I'm planning on adding to it depending on how things pan out.
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Super Contributor
Right now i have 9 companies listed on the JSE and 3 on the NYSE. They're in different sectors, mine are in Banking, Healthcare & Pharma, Transport, Technology, Retailers and maybe a few shares in one or two other sectors.
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Super Contributor
Apologies, shares - meaning companies
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Super Contributor
Hello Werner. Am up about 20% this year so far. Total long term shares is about 15 at the moment - one or two too many I think, so may consolidate in the coming year. Total DY on my portfolio at the moment is around 4.5% on purchase price, and I would like to see that increase towards the 6 or 7% mark in the coming year. Either by dropping my holdings in shares that dont pay dividends, or by increasing holdings in my shares that pay better yields.
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Super Contributor
Great post Werner...Long term +23.1%. Started a short term B account in March for tax reasons (where I try and catch the TA ups and downs) and that is +18.1%.
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Made 32% on my Magic Formula portfolio this year. Not as good as the 47% last year, but then the last half of 2009 was a brilliant recovery.
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HI Vitor. I am a great believer in the magic formula, for short to medium term, but am curious as to how it performs long term. Its principle is to buy undervalued stocks, based on low PE - but often those stocks are undervalued, due to performance issues (which it fails to filter out). So a market correction is inevitable (hence the short / medium term observation). Long term remains the question, as the quality of these stocks starts to come into question
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Super Contributor
The object is to buy undervalued stocks and NOT just stocks that reflect a low price to book or PE ratio. The most important factor is your view on the companies future prospects. The discounted value of future grow"th is by far the biggest determinant in a valuation due to its accelerating" compound nature.
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Super Contributor
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MF is not just based on low PE, it's also based on a company's ability to generate cash (ROCE ratio - the "E" also excludes debt if I remember my definitions correctly), and I think its this in combination with a low PE that makes it pick out good companies going cheap at the moment. Companies who generate truckloads of money tend to be systemically healthy. I bought only 4 companies this year, and two of them turned out to be on the Sunday Times list of best performing companies as far as share price was concerned for 2010. (Kumba, nr 2 and Assore, nr 4 on the list) So its not really the "Dogs of the DOW" kind of system.
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